Author Archive

    Are teachers truly ‘shifting away from the Station Rotation model?’

    February 15, 2017 | by Julia Freeland

    Late last year, we published a blog post on new evolutions on top of the Station Rotation blended-learning models that we’d been hearing about from educators on our Blended Learning Universe (BLU). Our friends at Education Elements didn’t agree fully with the way we characterized these shifts. In the spirit of healthy debate, we sat […]

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    Teachers are managers—so let’s give them the tools to manage

    January 24, 2017 | by Julia Freeland

    Good management is hard. Typically, employees grow into manager roles over time. In most industries, employees must first prove themselves effective at their own job; then, they may take on some administrative duties; and only much later do leaders oversee large groups of employees and become responsible for motivating, training, and retaining them. But two […]

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    6 tips from blended learning innovators leading change

    August 25, 2016 | by Julia Freeland

    Earlier this year, the Rhode Island-based Highlander Institute and the Clayton Christensen Institute teamed up to bring together a conference on blended and personalized learning in Providence, R.I. The goal of the event was to focus on the practical elements of blended and personalized learning by surfacing the tactics that practitioners were deploying in the […]

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    Is blended learning closing achievement gaps?

    April 8, 2016 | by Julia Freeland

    Often when we speak with K–12 educators about blended learning, teachers and leaders working in high-poverty neighborhoods want to know: does blended learning work for low-income students? Data so far suggests that the answer is yes, it can. But it’s a crucial question that the field needs to keep pushing, the answer to which should […]

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    Blended learning up close—really close

    March 25, 2016 | by Julia Freeland

    One of the miracles of modern microscopes is that they allow us to see things so up close that they look nearly unrecognizable. Take the following image: Picture: FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY/BARCROFT What looks like a painting by Kandinsky is actually something quite ordinary: a drop of orange juice, under a powerful microscope lens. In other […]

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