Loading...

Welcome to the BLU Personalized Learning Forum

Ask questions, get answers, and learn from blended learning leaders around the world

All Discussions

2 answers

See All

Clifford Maxwell, May 9, 2017
For online work, check out our blended learning MOOC here: https://www.coursera.org/learn/blended-learning. For in-person PD, our colleague Heather Staker is also doing live training (learn more here https://www.readytoblend.com/how_it_works). Additionally, I would look at training from iNACOL, and also look into modules on blended learning from the Relay Graduate School of Education. Read more...
Serge Pelletier, May 10, 2017
Thanks Clifford! I just registered for your MOOK. Can't wait to start on May 22nd! Read more...

May 4, 2017

rafizah

1 answer

See All

Clifford Maxwell, May 8, 2017
Of course - it simply depends on your circumstances. In a traditional classroom, it is impossible to modify instruction and learning activities to address every individual student's needs. In a blended environment, however, not only do students have an element of control over the time/place/path/pace of their learning, but teachers are equipped with tools that can give them the time, space, and data to more effectively meet the needs of the individual. Read more...

Apr 23, 2017

ahmed reda

1 answer

See All

Anonymous, Apr 28, 2017
Given how much programming involves practicing skills, I think a flex model might be most beneficial. With a flex model, you could minimize scheduled sessions for direct instruction and give students lots of time for practice and coaching.All that being said, I don't have direct experience running a flex model for teaching programming skills, so it would be good to get perspective from others as well. Read more...

0 answers

See All

Mar 24, 2017

Michael Weinraub
Expert Advisor

2 answers

See All

Michael Weinraub, Expert Advisor, Mar 24, 2017
I'm looking at you Stepan Mekhitarian ;)http://www.blendedlearning.org/directory/view-profile/5180#tab_home Read more...
Stepan Mekhitarian, Ed.D., Expert Advisor, Mar 27, 2017
Thanks Michael :-). In our local district, we insist that all professional development around blended learning be delivered in a blended, constructivist format with multiple opportunities for collaboration, research, and analysis. Educators learn about instructional practices and pedagogy while experiencing them in training sessions. This approach also gives them exposure to a variety of technical tools that they might consider using in their classrooms. We invite participants to join a growing cohort of teachers interested in learning more about blended learning and do several school visits to see blended learning in action. In some cases, teachers who attended our professional development offerings and classroom observations returned to their school sites and began leading this work there. Whenever possible, we work with them to build their capacity and to give them the opportunity to share their experiences with other educators at their school sites. This approach helps us cultivate leaders throughout the district to share their expertise, a critical step given the scope of our local district - nearly 130 schools! Read more...

2 answers

See All

Michael Fauteux, Expert Advisor, Mar 22, 2017
Real-time formative assessment tops my list as a must-have for blended learning programs. Using it changes student and teacher practice, empowering both to be responsive and more powerfully engaged with learning. Best, it is a very accessible practice for educators to start their exploration of blended learning with or to use to enhance a current program. While there are a few products on the market that do this well, I'm particularly invested in Gooru's real-time formative assessment tool (video overview) as a co-creator of it. Teacher-designed, free, and easy to use, it has helped systemically implement blended learning at my school network and produce strong outcomes. I particularly like Gooru's because it allows for locating and sharing assessment content and leveraging learning resources to provide next steps based on the assessment data. Regardless of the tool used, for me real-time formative assessment is one of those practices that produces the biggest "ah ha!" moments and shifts in practice of any blended learning component. Read more...
Stacey Roshan, May 1, 2017
I'm all about using edtech to gather analytics to get a sense of individual and class needs and to also best engage each and every learner in the room. If I had to narrow it down to two tools, I'd choose Pear Deck & EDpuzzle. I love this questions and actually wrote up a blog post on this topic earlier in the year - Put pedagogy before tech.Here are the primary reasons I choose Pear Deck and EDPuzzle as my go-to tools:They provide each student in the classroom an equal voice. In a traditional classroom discussion, students are called on or raise their hands to respond. As a result, teachers often repeatedly hear from the same students. In contrast, Pear Deck and EDpuzzle provide each student an opportunity to respond individually.They engage each student in the room. With these tools, each student is required to actively participate and respond to each question, form an opinion, and submit an answer.They create a safe space for each student to honestly respond and make mistakes. Answers are anonymous to the group so students don’t have to worry about how their peers might perceive their answers or worry about answering incorrectly.They allow educators to efficiently and effectively target class and individual student needs. The analytics provided show class trends and also provide indicators of individual students who are struggling.They differentiate how students can respond to questions. While some students are wonderful with oral discussion and on-the-spot responses, other students are best when they have time to process, collect their thoughts and type an answer. Read more...

0 answers

See All

1 answer

See All

Rebekah Kim, Expert Advisor, Mar 13, 2017
We use the blended learning block to personalize learning pathways for students by planning instructional groups based on students' strengths and areas of need. The rotations involve teacher-led core instruction, adaptive technology programs, small group instruction led by our ELL bilingual tutors and instructional classroom assistants. This allows core instruction, intervention and enrichment to take place. The data collected from these varying practices is used when looking at student growth and areas of need as we analyze standards-based assessment both formative and summative. Read more...

2 answers

See All

Thomas Arnett, Mar 10, 2017
This may seem count-intuitive, but I think the best place to start is by focusing on the student and teacher experiences, rather than the technology. Start by thinking about what you want students to learn and the types of experiences that will best promote that learning. Think about the challenges in the current learning environment you want to overcome. Think about the challenges teachers face. Then start to think about how technology could help with those challenges.This website has some great resources and guidelines for getting started. Read more...
Mackey Pendergrast, Expert Advisor, Mar 14, 2017
It starts with the basics. We always tell people to think about the "plumbing" before the "poetry". In other words, if your wifi infrastructure -- access points, servers, devices, etc.--. isn't up to the task then you better take care of that first or students and teachers will become demoralized quickly in the classroom. As far as the "poetry" goes, another top, fundamental priority is that your curriculum should be well-researched, clear and coherent....and all stakeholders should understand it. In short, if your curriculum or its implementation is poor then forget the laptops and take care of that as well. I know these items seems a little obvious but they are common mistakes. Exceptional technology will not fix a poor curriculum....ever. Once these fundamental components are ready it is very important that all central office and building administrators agree on the goals of technology implementation as well as the tangential pieces such as using a common vocabulary. Since the curriculum goals are clear, then most discussions about how technology can assist in achieving those goals will be much more seamless and organic. We are very explicit and intentional that we don't want to use technology to merely do "cool stuff" but we want to use it, foremost, to improve student learning and if it doesn't do that then we are wasting a lot of money. So, to this end, we always set measurable goals and we have to build capacity at the point of delivery--teachers and classrooms -- to reach those goals. Therefore, you cannot build a technology driven culture unless your professional development plan is aligned between your curriculum and the technology tools that you choose. Finally, I also would advise bringing in your early adopters....early... and have them experiment and build enthusiasm amongst the staff through in-house PD sharing, reporting out at faculty meetings, or peer coaching. Read more...

Mar 6, 2017

Amy Ahearn

1 answer

See All

Clifford Maxwell, Mar 7, 2017
The reason that the model decision comes after physical design is because the model should be built to support your instructional choices (which includes classroom design)—not the other way around. What this does is ensure that you adhere to students and teachers first and foremost, instead of adhering to what a model may or may not require at the outset. The design steps are intentionally ordered such that choosing the model is the last thing you do. After considering student needs, teacher needs, space constraints and desires, technology needs, etc, there will hopefully be an instructional model or combination of models that align best to all of your design considerations. Of course during the Refine and Iterate phase, the design of the classroom should be tested and improved to better serve your students, so as in all things innovation nothing should be set in stone! Read more...

Resources

Want more? Our comprehensive collection of resources can help you build a blended learning program from the ground up.

Resources