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3 Search Results for EdTech

Jan 27, 2017

Hiba Amjad

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Katrina Bushko, Feb 22, 2017
Hi Hiba! This is an important question. The framework that we use at the Christensen Institute makes a critical distinction between using technology for technology's sake (tech-rich) versus using technology to achieve a goal such as personalization (blended learning). Of course bridging the digital divide (à la ICT4D) can be a great step towards personalization, but in order to truly personalize a student's learning experience, it's important to start with a rallying cry that can lead you towards not only the right hardware and software choices, but also towards new teacher roles, student roles, and learning models. This is why choosing the technology comes as step #5 in our design wheel for blended learning! I hope this helps! Read more...

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Thomas Arnett, Mar 10, 2017
This may seem count-intuitive, but I think the best place to start is by focusing on the student and teacher experiences, rather than the technology. Start by thinking about what you want students to learn and the types of experiences that will best promote that learning. Think about the challenges in the current learning environment you want to overcome. Think about the challenges teachers face. Then start to think about how technology could help with those challenges.This website has some great resources and guidelines for getting started. Read more...
Mackey Pendergrast, Expert Advisor, Mar 14, 2017
It starts with the basics. We always tell people to think about the "plumbing" before the "poetry". In other words, if your wifi infrastructure -- access points, servers, devices, etc.--. isn't up to the task then you better take care of that first or students and teachers will become demoralized quickly in the classroom. As far as the "poetry" goes, another top, fundamental priority is that your curriculum should be well-researched, clear and coherent....and all stakeholders should understand it. In short, if your curriculum or its implementation is poor then forget the laptops and take care of that as well. I know these items seems a little obvious but they are common mistakes. Exceptional technology will not fix a poor curriculum....ever. Once these fundamental components are ready it is very important that all central office and building administrators agree on the goals of technology implementation as well as the tangential pieces such as using a common vocabulary. Since the curriculum goals are clear, then most discussions about how technology can assist in achieving those goals will be much more seamless and organic. We are very explicit and intentional that we don't want to use technology to merely do "cool stuff" but we want to use it, foremost, to improve student learning and if it doesn't do that then we are wasting a lot of money. So, to this end, we always set measurable goals and we have to build capacity at the point of delivery--teachers and classrooms -- to reach those goals. Therefore, you cannot build a technology driven culture unless your professional development plan is aligned between your curriculum and the technology tools that you choose. Finally, I also would advise bringing in your early adopters....early... and have them experiment and build enthusiasm amongst the staff through in-house PD sharing, reporting out at faculty meetings, or peer coaching. Read more...

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Michael Fauteux, Expert Advisor, Mar 22, 2017
Real-time formative assessment tops my list as a must-have for blended learning programs. Using it changes student and teacher practice, empowering both to be responsive and more powerfully engaged with learning. Best, it is a very accessible practice for educators to start their exploration of blended learning with or to use to enhance a current program. While there are a few products on the market that do this well, I'm particularly invested in Gooru's real-time formative assessment tool (video overview) as a co-creator of it. Teacher-designed, free, and easy to use, it has helped systemically implement blended learning at my school network and produce strong outcomes. I particularly like Gooru's because it allows for locating and sharing assessment content and leveraging learning resources to provide next steps based on the assessment data. Regardless of the tool used, for me real-time formative assessment is one of those practices that produces the biggest "ah ha!" moments and shifts in practice of any blended learning component. Read more...
Stacey Roshan, May 1, 2017
I'm all about using edtech to gather analytics to get a sense of individual and class needs and to also best engage each and every learner in the room. If I had to narrow it down to two tools, I'd choose Pear Deck & EDpuzzle. I love this questions and actually wrote up a blog post on this topic earlier in the year - Put pedagogy before tech.Here are the primary reasons I choose Pear Deck and EDPuzzle as my go-to tools:They provide each student in the classroom an equal voice. In a traditional classroom discussion, students are called on or raise their hands to respond. As a result, teachers often repeatedly hear from the same students. In contrast, Pear Deck and EDpuzzle provide each student an opportunity to respond individually.They engage each student in the room. With these tools, each student is required to actively participate and respond to each question, form an opinion, and submit an answer.They create a safe space for each student to honestly respond and make mistakes. Answers are anonymous to the group so students don’t have to worry about how their peers might perceive their answers or worry about answering incorrectly.They allow educators to efficiently and effectively target class and individual student needs. The analytics provided show class trends and also provide indicators of individual students who are struggling.They differentiate how students can respond to questions. While some students are wonderful with oral discussion and on-the-spot responses, other students are best when they have time to process, collect their thoughts and type an answer. Read more...

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