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12 Search Results for blended

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Bailey Thomson, Expert Advisor, Jan 8, 2017
At SPARK, we see blended learning and the use of technology as a tool to leverage, not as an ultimate outcome. As such, we measure the effectiveness of our blended learning model by taking a look at student achievement results and satisfaction/engagement surveys from parents, staff, and students. We aren't willing to subject some students to blended learning and leave others aside, so I doubt we will ever be able to make meaningful comparisons between achievement with and without technology. However, that's all well and good, because blended learning is a whole greater than the sum of its parts. Our models are not just about technology implementation, but also include culture-setting, behaviour management, social-emotional development, peer and teacher relationship-building and so much other soft "glue" that makes the whole model effective. Read more...
Clifford Hong, Expert Advisor, Jan 15, 2017
For me, it starts with selecting the right data points. For example, if your blended program is designed to improve students' reading skills, perhaps you would use iReady, SRI, or NWEA Maps. You would do a diagnostic, then run your blended program, and then run the assessment again, perhaps a month later to see if the data has improved. The tricky part is selecting the right data points, because you need to be able to efficiently collect the data and have it reported in a usable form. Read more...
Rebekah Kim, Expert Advisor, Jan 19, 2017
Identify the key factors in implementing the program with fidelity and the specific skills/standards the program is marketing itself to support students in. Hold staff accountable in implementing programs with fidelity. This includes administration master scheduling to allow appropriate blocks of content time. Then, align an external pre, mid and post assessment measurements to monitor progress. This will help to determine if the skills being worked on in a program are being generalized and mastered outside of the program. If progress is not being made, then adjusting time or a program change is necessary in personalizing the learning pathway for each child. This can happen using an MTSS structure that looks at a variety of measurements, which includes, formative, benchmark and summative assessments. Of these assessments, it can be technology or non-technology based. I have never been shy to ask program vendors and strategists how they can help us to determine if progress is being made by using our own external data measurements to determine the effectiveness of a program. When we have not seen effectiveness based on external measurements, we have discontinued the program. Read more...
Donna Henry, Feb 1, 2017
That's a really good question. In Lewisville ISD, we look at the following indicators: course completion, grade distribution, state assessment data, and enrollment demographics. Additionally, we look at parent and student survey data. We also conducted an interesting study this year where we compared a teacher's face-to-face classes and blended classes (see data indicators above). We found that the blended classes out-performed the traditional classes. Read more...

Jan 5, 2017

Ashley Bryan
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Sam J. Brooks, Expert Advisor, Jan 5, 2017
Our district (Putnam County Schools TN) is very lucky to have the Putnam County VITAL program as the lead for all personalized learning in our district. The VITAL program also has the lead for all Professional Learning for teachers and is moving toward PD Credentialing as time moves on. The VITAL program also pushes out trainings that can be both "traditional" and "virtual" in delivery. We feel confident that if teachers can experience the benefits of being in a personalized learning delivery of teacher professional learning, they will understand the student experience and outcomes much better. I hope this helps! Read more...
Kenneth Grover, Expert Advisor, Jan 12, 2017
As I work with teachers and staff from around the country, we begin by focusing on the core beliefs the group has about student learning how we take those beliefs and meet them through blended learning and personalized learning. Read more...
Barbara Treacy, Jan 19, 2017
One of the most effective (including cost-effective) ways to on-board new staff, is to provide opportunities for teachers to visit the classrooms of other teachers who have started to transition to blended learning. Through classroom visits, teachers can learn from what other teachers are doing, and the visits can also increase collaboration and dialogue within the school around blended learning. Read more...
Rebekah Kim, Expert Advisor, Jan 30, 2017
For the last several years, we have created a Blended Learning 101 Orientation for new staff. Since we have over 85 staff members at our school, it is important that we set aside time and resources for new staff to our school to spend time reading, engaging and learning about our blended learning structures before the school year begins. Most recently, we used excerpts from Go BlendEd, Liz Arney, for staff to understand the baseline of structures. As we continue to strive to go deeper with our work by personalizing what is taking place in these BL structures, we have the confidence that all teaching staff have a foundational understanding of what the expected instructional structures of a 1:1 classroom setting entails. Read more...

Jan 5, 2017

Sam J. Brooks
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Bailey Thomson, Expert Advisor, Jan 7, 2017
At SPARK Schools, we made the deliberate choice not to implement a 1:1 in either our foundation phase (K-3) or intermediate phase (4-7) blended learning models. In the lower grades, we use a lab rotation model and generally keep technology out of the classroom, up to and including smart boards. Our students spend the majority of their time in relationship with their peers and teachers via guided work and collaborative work in the classroom and use Chromebooks in our Learning Lab for about an hour a day. In our intermediate phase, we employ a flex/individual rotation and find that a 1:1 is a poor choice for both capacity utilization of assets, because there are huge swaths of time when students are working together or with a teacher and do not need a device, and that it limits their social-emotional development with peers and with teachers. Read more...
Kenneth Grover, Expert Advisor, Jan 13, 2017
While 1:1 initiatives provide the necessary tools to personalize the learning environment, computers are still just a tool. We decided to provide computers as needed for students to check them out and we also encourage students bring their own computers (if they have them). Read more...
Donna Henry, Feb 1, 2017
In Lewisville ISD we implemented a 1:X (TM) program five years ago. While students in grades 4-12 do have district-provided iPADS, the goal with 1:X (TM) is to shift the focus on learning and selecting the right tool for the task. Read more...

Jan 9, 2017

Sherre Vernon
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Donna Henry, Feb 1, 2017
This is such a great question! In Lewisville ISD we collect a lot of data about blended: attendance, completion, grade distribution, demographic, and assessment. But your question is what we are going after now. When I walk our blended classes at the secondary level (students attend class two days a week and learn online three days a week -- at the class vs. program level), I see all of the pieces in your question playing out differently. And how they play out shows up the the rather traditional data we do collect. All to say, we are just now discussing how to conduct research about how students and teachers are spending their time. I'll get back to this question as our discussion deepens. Read more...

Jan 10, 2017

Anonymous

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Kenneth Grover, Expert Advisor, Jan 11, 2017
School transformation must be undertaken with great passion in what we all believe about student learning. Transformation, not change, allows the beliefs about student learning to be followed by shifts in instructional practices, adjustments in school structures, and the inclusion of the tools to support the shift. Read more...
Clifford Maxwell, Jan 18, 2017
One practice that has proven successful not just in schools but across industries when seeking to transform yourself is to start somewhere where the risk is low and the current alternative is "nothing". For example, perhaps there are students in your school who have to go without an elective because it's not offered. Start offering that online, and figure out what works best for scheduling, outcomes, monitoring growth, etc. Then take lessons from that pilot and see if you can start to incorporate them into your core courses. This discovery-driven planning process will be critical to figure out what is and isn't working as quickly as possible. Read more...

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Clifford Maxwell, Feb 7, 2017
For some video training and PD, I would definitely check out resources at BetterLesson - you may find helpful insights from teachers who have created blended lesson plans for a variety of standards. Additionally, there is a treasure trove of content for specific teacher practices from The Learning Accelerator at their Practices at Work tool. Read more...

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Donna Henry, Feb 1, 2017
That's a really good question. In Lewisville ISD, we look at the following indicators: course completion, grade distribution, state assessment data, and enrollment demographics. Additionally, we look at parent and student survey data. We also conducted an interesting study this year where we compared a teacher's face-to-face classes and blended classes (see data indicators above). We found that the blended classes out-performed the traditional classes. Read more...
Julia Freeland Fisher, Feb 21, 2017
This is such an important question. We have a couple organizing frameworks to think about this - first, when you design a blended program what problem are you trying to solve? Some blended programs are first just trying to expand access... others are looking to target specific student populations to bolster test scores. Measuring a program against it's intended purpose is key - otherwise we may hold early implementation to too high a bar and kill innovation before it can take off. It's also worth noting that if you're using blended to personalize learning, some blended approaches may be working really well for some students and not for others. Traditionally if an intervention is only working for a subset of students we throw it out - but if you manage to measure blended learning results at the individual student level, you can start to offer a menu of experiences that fit different students' preferences and needs.Here's video where we talk through some of these distinctions:http://christenseninstitute.org/blog/unpacking-whether-blended-learning-works/ Read more...
Hannah Benoit, Feb 21, 2017
Thank you both for your thoughtful answers!

Feb 2, 2017

Deb Ramm

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Jennifer Wolfe, Feb 7, 2017
Deb, My short answer would be to start blended or personalized learning PLCs with different groups of teachers and then start with some of these meatier problems. I recommend you pose these challenges back to the teachers to wrestle with and to pick small steps that they can build upon as the PLC grows in maturity. Read more...
Juliana Finegan, Feb 15, 2017
You can also have teachers build personal PD playlists to fill individual needs and gaps. By having educators reflect on their individual areas of need, you can help them expand their practice, identify innovative strategies, and improve their approach on a personal basis. Here are some free resources you can explore to share with your educators and give them opportunities to go beyond their current models: TLA Practices - this site gives various practices educators can apply to their classroom. The search bar at the top is particularly helpful when building a playlist because they can search for topics like "student autonomy" and identify different strategies that have been used by the schools showcased. Relay GSE blended learning courses - these can be taken asynchronously or broken apart into sections to help teachers strengthen their skills in mindset, routines, culture, analyzing data, lesson planning, and even becoming a blended leader. Read more...
Juliana Finegan, Feb 15, 2017
For some reason the hyperlinks didn't go through so here they are again!Relay GSE courses:https://www.canvas.net/browse/relayTLA Practices sitehttp://practices.learningaccelerator.org Read more...

Feb 13, 2017

Anonymous

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Thomas Arnett, Mar 10, 2017
To help provide context, can you share a link to where you've seen references to a "whole school experience"? Read more...

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Thomas Arnett, Mar 10, 2017
Michele, do you want to know about what could go wrong in the design and roll out of a blended learning program, or what could go wrong while teaching a blended learning class session? Read more...
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