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8 Search Results for teachers

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Sam J. Brooks, Expert Advisor, Jan 6, 2017
Many teachers feel threatened when discussing the onset of blended or personalized learning for students. Allowing them to get involved at their own pace is key to success along the way. We are entertaining digital natives in the classroom now and teachers have to be given time to "catch up" with the students. An attitude of "productive failure" is important and teachers must have the opportunity to try new things out, even if they fail at first. The one thing for certain is most students know more about technology than our teachers, but it is OK to learn from our students along the way. A more engaged classroom is the goal! This will give more time for teachers to work with students and differentiate the learning. Teachers who personalize classrooms must have room to try new things, even if they fail sometimes along the way. Read more...
Sherre Vernon, Expert Advisor, Jan 10, 2017
Teachers, as much as students, benefit from a personalized approach. The key is figuring out why they aren't motivated -- and their reasons do differ. Some, as Sam mentioned, have little or no experience with technology and are intimidated by it; others are successful teachers who don't see the need to fix what's not broken (these teachers often discover that blended learning fits in well with their already personalized approach int he classroom); some fear the impact of difficult-to-regulate screen time; some love to be front-and-center in their classrooms and blended learning shifts that; some don't want to do the data analysis and re-teaching that blended learning often highlights as necessary; I'm sure there are other motivations that aren't coming to mind right now. The point is, each of these motivations for resistance needs a different type of response from school leadership to "de-mystify" what happens in blended learning. Simulated blended learning experiences in the proposed digital platform, if done well, can help with this. There's also a need for capacity building (around data; student accountability; class routines) depending on where the teacher's resistance is coming from. Read more...
Rebekah Kim, Expert Advisor, Jan 19, 2017
Make the structures, resources and content relevant to what teachers want and need to help make students successful. In today's mad search for high quality CCSS aligned resources, we are in need of game changing approaches to teaching. Unpacking of standards, identifying resources and knowing that it is aligned to student achievement measurements is a priority in education. If we listen, name it and help our teaching staff in this journey, it could lead to better buy in. Read more...
Denis Zaff, Jan 20, 2017
We come from a slightly different angle as most of our instructors focus on corporate training.The most successful and efficient instructors who use Rukuku.com to deliver blended training programs got there by what we internally call a "snow ball approach". These instructors grow into their roles by:starting a small, simple programthen building on that program by taking many incremental steps Read more...

Jan 5, 2017

Ashley Bryan
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Paresh Sagar, Mar 7, 2017
You need One school apps that customize everything. Please Visit:http://excellentwebworld.com/project/school-app/ Read more...

Jan 9, 2017

Sherre Vernon
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Donna Henry, Feb 1, 2017
This is such a great question! In Lewisville ISD we collect a lot of data about blended: attendance, completion, grade distribution, demographic, and assessment. But your question is what we are going after now. When I walk our blended classes at the secondary level (students attend class two days a week and learn online three days a week -- at the class vs. program level), I see all of the pieces in your question playing out differently. And how they play out shows up the the rather traditional data we do collect. All to say, we are just now discussing how to conduct research about how students and teachers are spending their time. I'll get back to this question as our discussion deepens. Read more...

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Paul Murray, Jan 23, 2017
A few keys for success here are...Lead by exampleProve valueStart smallCreate a safe environment for innovationThose who lead by example have a greater chance of affecting change. It's one thing to tell a teacher about a tool or instructional method, it's another to see it in action. So many educational theories and practices exist or are recirculated over and over, change can be difficult. However, if you can prove the value of a new practice, teachers begin to listen. Additionally, help your teachers start small. For many, developing their technology skills is a challenge and they have to learn that doing so is a process. Changing your instructional practices can be scary, especially if you fear that taking a risk will cost you points on an evaluation. Setting up a safe environment for risk and failure is important.I hope that you find a few of these quick thoughts useful as you begin to work with your colleagues. Good Luck! Read more...
Rebekah Kim, Expert Advisor, Mar 13, 2017
Bring teacher leader experiences and successes to the staff. Develop a leadership team to be key implementers and pioneers. Make them curious and want to get on board with you! Read more...
Michael Weinraub, Expert Advisor, Mar 27, 2017
The answer to this, like many things in life is simple. Coffee. Only partly joking. Invite them to take their coffee break in your room while your students are engaged in some aspect of blended learning. There is nothing as powerful as getting a live, ground-level view of kids and their teachers working it out in a classroom setting. So while they sip their hot coffee sitting at your desk, or chatting with students at work throughout the classroom, they get a low-stakes, authentic way to see what all the fuss is about. Read more...

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Clifford Maxwell, Feb 7, 2017
For some video training and PD, I would definitely check out resources at BetterLesson - you may find helpful insights from teachers who have created blended lesson plans for a variety of standards. Additionally, there is a treasure trove of content for specific teacher practices from The Learning Accelerator at their Practices at Work tool. Read more...

Feb 2, 2017

Deb Ramm

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Jennifer Wolfe, Feb 7, 2017
Deb, My short answer would be to start blended or personalized learning PLCs with different groups of teachers and then start with some of these meatier problems. I recommend you pose these challenges back to the teachers to wrestle with and to pick small steps that they can build upon as the PLC grows in maturity. Read more...
Juliana Finegan, Feb 15, 2017
You can also have teachers build personal PD playlists to fill individual needs and gaps. By having educators reflect on their individual areas of need, you can help them expand their practice, identify innovative strategies, and improve their approach on a personal basis. Here are some free resources you can explore to share with your educators and give them opportunities to go beyond their current models: TLA Practices - this site gives various practices educators can apply to their classroom. The search bar at the top is particularly helpful when building a playlist because they can search for topics like "student autonomy" and identify different strategies that have been used by the schools showcased. Relay GSE blended learning courses - these can be taken asynchronously or broken apart into sections to help teachers strengthen their skills in mindset, routines, culture, analyzing data, lesson planning, and even becoming a blended leader. Read more...
Juliana Finegan, Feb 15, 2017
For some reason the hyperlinks didn't go through so here they are again!Relay GSE courses:https://www.canvas.net/browse/relayTLA Practices sitehttp://practices.learningaccelerator.org Read more...

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ryan piper, Mar 6, 2017
Teachers do not necessarily need a new set of skills to be successful in blended learning, but they will need a new mindset on what their role in the classroom is. I find myself spending way less time in front of the class, and way more time working with individual or small groups of students. The blended approach gives the students an opportunity to learn from other sources besides me: videos, interactive lessons, other students, etc. It gives a tremendous opportunity to those students who need additional teacher support. One that was not available with traditional teaching as the teacher would either drag students who were not ready along, or make students who have already mastered the standard repeat it a second day. Read more...

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