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3 Search Results for personalized learning

Jan 5, 2017

Sam J. Brooks
Expert Advisor

4 answers

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Sherre Vernon, Expert Advisor, Jan 9, 2017
Hello Sam,Thrive opened with the plan to provide personalized learning to all of our students, so we didn't have an internal shift of priorities. This intentional start, however, came from working in traditional school settings, seeing some students held back in their learning and others unable to catch up to their peers. We took a hard look at the fact that we've been doing school pretty much the same way since the onset of the industrial revolution, despite the fact that our students' needs have changed drastically. Personalized learning also lets us capitalize on student voice and choice. As we know as adults, the more agency we have over our experiences, the more likely we are to buy into them. We believe that the same goes for students. Sherre Read more...
Kenneth Grover, Expert Advisor, Jan 12, 2017
After soliciting feedback from our students, it was clear that our assumptions about the traditional industrialized model of education does not work. Our moral imperative to act became evident--so we did! Read more...
Mackey Pendergrast, Expert Advisor, Mar 14, 2017
There are a few different ways to answer this question. First, there has been a discussion in education circles for over two decades relative to differentiation so, in one sense, personalized learning is not a new topic. The difference, however, in 2017, is that we now have the tools to address the needs of each learner whether through standards or competencies. Adaptive diagnostics such as iReady, playlists with built-in formative assessments, dashboards where students can visualize progress and the immediacy of feedback possible through digital platforms are truly innovative features in education that make personalized learning reachable. We started by asking the question -- How DON"T we want our students to learn? And, of course, most parents or educators very quickly arrive at the conclusion that they want their children to feel a sense of ownership in their learning as well as to address their individual needs. To this end, thoughtful technology integration brings us closer to those goals. Additionally, the Morris School District is a very diverse student population with over one-third of our students on FRL and another third of our students in the upper socio-economic level. With such wide differences it made great sense for us to completely dive into this concept. Finally, we believe strongly in many traditional practices. Blended learning does not mean throwing out the baby with the bathwater. Yet, technology is not going away and we feel that it is difficult to make the case that students will be prepared for a good and useful life if they are not adept at "knowing how to know" when it comes to technology. Read more...
Sam J. Brooks, Expert Advisor, Mar 16, 2017
Thanks to everyone who provided comments to the question. This is great conversation and I enjoyed ready them. Sam Read more...

Jan 5, 2017

Sam J. Brooks
Expert Advisor

3 answers

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Bailey Thomson, Expert Advisor, Jan 7, 2017
At SPARK Schools, we made the deliberate choice not to implement a 1:1 in either our foundation phase (K-3) or intermediate phase (4-7) blended learning models. In the lower grades, we use a lab rotation model and generally keep technology out of the classroom, up to and including smart boards. Our students spend the majority of their time in relationship with their peers and teachers via guided work and collaborative work in the classroom and use Chromebooks in our Learning Lab for about an hour a day. In our intermediate phase, we employ a flex/individual rotation and find that a 1:1 is a poor choice for both capacity utilization of assets, because there are huge swaths of time when students are working together or with a teacher and do not need a device, and that it limits their social-emotional development with peers and with teachers. Read more...
Kenneth Grover, Expert Advisor, Jan 13, 2017
While 1:1 initiatives provide the necessary tools to personalize the learning environment, computers are still just a tool. We decided to provide computers as needed for students to check them out and we also encourage students bring their own computers (if they have them). Read more...
Donna Henry, Feb 1, 2017
In Lewisville ISD we implemented a 1:X (TM) program five years ago. While students in grades 4-12 do have district-provided iPADS, the goal with 1:X (TM) is to shift the focus on learning and selecting the right tool for the task. Read more...

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Michael Fauteux, Expert Advisor, Mar 22, 2017
Real-time formative assessment tops my list as a must-have for blended learning programs. Using it changes student and teacher practice, empowering both to be responsive and more powerfully engaged with learning. Best, it is a very accessible practice for educators to start their exploration of blended learning with or to use to enhance a current program. While there are a few products on the market that do this well, I'm particularly invested in Gooru's real-time formative assessment tool (video overview) as a co-creator of it. Teacher-designed, free, and easy to use, it has helped systemically implement blended learning at my school network and produce strong outcomes. I particularly like Gooru's because it allows for locating and sharing assessment content and leveraging learning resources to provide next steps based on the assessment data. Regardless of the tool used, for me real-time formative assessment is one of those practices that produces the biggest "ah ha!" moments and shifts in practice of any blended learning component. Read more...
Stacey Roshan, May 1, 2017
I'm all about using edtech to gather analytics to get a sense of individual and class needs and to also best engage each and every learner in the room. If I had to narrow it down to two tools, I'd choose Pear Deck & EDpuzzle. I love this questions and actually wrote up a blog post on this topic earlier in the year - Put pedagogy before tech.Here are the primary reasons I choose Pear Deck and EDPuzzle as my go-to tools:They provide each student in the classroom an equal voice. In a traditional classroom discussion, students are called on or raise their hands to respond. As a result, teachers often repeatedly hear from the same students. In contrast, Pear Deck and EDpuzzle provide each student an opportunity to respond individually.They engage each student in the room. With these tools, each student is required to actively participate and respond to each question, form an opinion, and submit an answer.They create a safe space for each student to honestly respond and make mistakes. Answers are anonymous to the group so students don’t have to worry about how their peers might perceive their answers or worry about answering incorrectly.They allow educators to efficiently and effectively target class and individual student needs. The analytics provided show class trends and also provide indicators of individual students who are struggling.They differentiate how students can respond to questions. While some students are wonderful with oral discussion and on-the-spot responses, other students are best when they have time to process, collect their thoughts and type an answer. Read more...

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