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2 Search Results for administrators

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Paul Murray, Jan 23, 2017
A few keys for success here are...Lead by exampleProve valueStart smallCreate a safe environment for innovationThose who lead by example have a greater chance of affecting change. It's one thing to tell a teacher about a tool or instructional method, it's another to see it in action. So many educational theories and practices exist or are recirculated over and over, change can be difficult. However, if you can prove the value of a new practice, teachers begin to listen. Additionally, help your teachers start small. For many, developing their technology skills is a challenge and they have to learn that doing so is a process. Changing your instructional practices can be scary, especially if you fear that taking a risk will cost you points on an evaluation. Setting up a safe environment for risk and failure is important.I hope that you find a few of these quick thoughts useful as you begin to work with your colleagues. Good Luck! Read more...
Rebekah Kim, Expert Advisor, Mar 13, 2017
Bring teacher leader experiences and successes to the staff. Develop a leadership team to be key implementers and pioneers. Make them curious and want to get on board with you! Read more...
Michael Weinraub, Expert Advisor, Mar 27, 2017
The answer to this, like many things in life is simple. Coffee. Only partly joking. Invite them to take their coffee break in your room while your students are engaged in some aspect of blended learning. There is nothing as powerful as getting a live, ground-level view of kids and their teachers working it out in a classroom setting. So while they sip their hot coffee sitting at your desk, or chatting with students at work throughout the classroom, they get a low-stakes, authentic way to see what all the fuss is about. Read more...

Jan 25, 2017

Stepan Mekhitarian, Ed.D.
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Christopher McNamara, Mar 5, 2017
I think there are a number of effective ways in which School administrators can support their teachers.1. Provide a clarity of purpose to the community. If you can get your community of parents on board with understanding why a blended approach is important for the School and their children then I think this gives teachers the confidence and space to develop their practice and try new approaches.2. Build a community of practice. At Melbourne Girls Grammar, we have implemented a blended learning paradigm in Year 9 and on a weekly basis we have drop in lunch meetings with the teachers. This gives them an opportunity to share ideas and strategies and tell each other what is working for them and what they are struggling with.3. The other things we do that we feel is supportive is we talk to our girls about their experiences. Our girls are great with letting us know what works and what doesn't. we collect this feedback formally and informally and we feed it back to the teachers so that they are affirmed or with action items that they can build into their practice to improve the experience of the girls. There are plenty of other strategies we use, but we have found these to be particularly positive and supportive. Read more...
Rebekah Kim, Expert Advisor, Mar 13, 2017
As a leader and leader I have a few words of advice to share: Advocate and seek support and resources from system leadership to develop your vision. Learn from other leaders who have been through the experience.Develop a leadership team with stakeholder voice. Learn with your leadership team. Try on small pieces to learn from successes and challenges before going to scale. Progress monitor, adjust, be okay with needed changes to programs and structures. Read more...
Andrew Frishman, Expert Advisor, Mar 15, 2017
I feel that direct experience is key. First step would be to visit some schools/classrooms with well established approaches and see what the experience feels like as a student. Then try teaching some of the lessons yourself (perhaps shadowing an existing teacher with relevant experience). Then (and only then) see about trying to implement it in a school where you are an administrator. This helps to follow the rule of "Don't ask anyone to do something that you wouldn't do (and/or haven't already done] yourself." Read more...

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