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11 Search Results for models

Mar 6, 2017

Amy Ahearn

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Clifford Maxwell, Mar 7, 2017
The reason that the model decision comes after physical design is because the model should be built to support your instructional choices (which includes classroom design)—not the other way around. What this does is ensure that you adhere to students and teachers first and foremost, instead of adhering to what a model may or may not require at the outset. The design steps are intentionally ordered such that choosing the model is the last thing you do. After considering student needs, teacher needs, space constraints and desires, technology needs, etc, there will hopefully be an instructional model or combination of models that align best to all of your design considerations. Of course during the Refine and Iterate phase, the design of the classroom should be tested and improved to better serve your students, so as in all things innovation nothing should be set in stone! Read more...

Apr 23, 2017

ahmed reda

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Anonymous, Apr 28, 2017
Given how much programming involves practicing skills, I think a flex model might be most beneficial. With a flex model, you could minimize scheduled sessions for direct instruction and give students lots of time for practice and coaching.All that being said, I don't have direct experience running a flex model for teaching programming skills, so it would be good to get perspective from others as well. Read more...

Jul 28, 2017

Anonymous

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Nikolaus Namba, Expert Advisor, Aug 3, 2017
Hello, I think these are great things to be considering at the moment. My first bit of advice would be to go and purchase, Blended: Using Disruptive Innovation to Improve SchoolsBook by Heather Staker and Michael B. Horn. I think this text does a wonderful job breaking down the different blended models, and advice for what might work best. It is also great that you are aware of the need to have strong standard operating procedures built with your learners. These procedures, if practiced and owned by the learners, will guide for successful implementation of any model selected. The last bit of advice is not to try and bite off a huge chunk at the beginning. Allow the learners and yourself to feel successful in bits and pieces along the way. Read more...

Nov 21, 2017

Godfrey

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Michael Weinraub, Expert Advisor, Nov 22, 2017
Hey Godfrey, I think others will have better direct responses to your very practical question but Horn and Staker's Blended is certainly a good foundational resource to have close by.https://www.amazon.com/Blended-Disruptive-Innovation-Improve-Schools/dp/1118955153But if you are going down the blended learning rabbit hole, I would take Neil Selwyn's Distrusting Educational Technology with you. As a technologist, he is certainly not anti-edtech, but he helps us to embrace edtech with critical eyes open. Highly recommended.https://www.amazon.com/Distrusting-Educational-Technology-Critical-Questions/dp/0415708001 Read more...
Kira Keane, Nov 22, 2017
Hi - We pulled together a collection of really specific blended and personalized learning strategies on our website, along with in-depth profiles of schools across the country that are blending. All of the content is free for you to use and share. Hope you find it helpful! - Kira Read more...

Mar 17, 2018

Anonymous

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Troy Faulkner, Expert Advisor, Mar 22, 2018
I would say the flipped mastery or the peer instruction flipped learning model.
DANIEL OWENS, Mar 23, 2018
I'm not sure I would say there is one "best" blended learning model for physical science as a lot of it depends on context and student needs. Cisco Junior High School does a combination of station rotations and individual rotations that seems to be working really well for their students. I've listed a few links to some of their practices below:- 1:1 Data Conferences:https://practices.learningaccelerator.org/strategies/11-data-conferences- Student Feedback with Emoji Folders: https://practices.learningaccelerator.org/strategies/collecting-quick-feedback-with-emoji-folders- Cisco School Model:https://practices.learningaccelerator.org/see/cisco-junior-high-school Read more...

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Stella Maris Berdaxagar, Mar 26, 2018
It largely depends on the number of students, their prior knowledge, personal and shared resources and learning goals. Our school has a BYOD program.I flip my classes via Edmodo and connected apps and sometimes Google Classroom and Microsoft Apps. I usually create hyperDocs , LiveBinders or Onenote Notebooks or Symbaloo lesson plans or Versal courses with options to support integrated skills in individual and collaborative tasks based on student's voice and choice with timely and deferred feedforward , and permanent assessment. Read more...

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Katrina Bushko, Apr 16, 2018
Hi Laura,Although we say that the Flex model has online learning as its "backbone," it doesn't mean that the software has to be adaptive. You can design many different learning activities in an online format that students can access according to their needs. One example that comes to mind is EM Emílio Carlos in Rio de Janeiro. The teacher using this model, Eric Rodrigues, doesn't have internet access during his class period, so he himself has to ensure that all of his online content is accessible and varied. Even though he doesn't have adaptable software, the reason we call this an Individual Rotation rather than Flex is that he creates individualized playlists for this students out of the different activities – in a Flex model, the activities are there and students have the option (the flexibility, if you will) to choose which activities they do when. Does that make sense? Read more...

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Luis Flores, Jun 6, 2018
Hello DeEtta,Thank you for asking this question. The paraprofessional or non-teacher role is certainly beneficial to have on some models and perhaps required in one model (if you are using a lab rotation and students are leaving the classroom to go to a computer lab, you probably want to have an adult that can supervise the students. But do not feel that having an additional adult makes these harder or less beneficial.The reason that some models depict a paraprofessional role is that we wanted to depict what schools with the additional support could do to get the most out of their support staff. The paraprofessional can supervise students working online, assist students who are struggling, and/or look over student learning data while the teacher is working with small groups or individuals.But not having access to one is not an issue at all. You can still have station rotation models where a group of students works with the teacher, another group can work on a collaborative project, and another group can work independently and at their own pace online. Many of the tasks that the paraprofessional would do, can be done by the computers (keeping students engaged, providing them personalized instruction, creating individualized learning playlists, etc.)While we always hope (and believe) that all students should have access to many impactful and caring adults, we know that sometimes there is just one teacher in a class of 30+ students. The blended learning models were designed with this in mind and can still have a positive impact no matter the specific circumstances you find yourself in. I hope this answered your question! Read more...
Luis Flores, Jun 6, 2018
In addition to my answer, even if you do not have a paraprofessional, there are still other ways you can leverage your current staff and fellow teachers to create teams of teachers or other unique staffing arrangements. You can read about your latest research on these innovative staffing arrangements herehttps://www.christenseninstitute.org/publications/staffing/ Read more...

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Jenny White, Aug 8, 2018
Hi Michelle - thanks for your question! This blog posthttps://www.blendedlearning.org/4-ideas-for-building-a-performing-arts-blended-learning-program/ Read more...
Jenny White, Aug 8, 2018
The blog linked above features helpful ideas for transforming a K-12 performing arts class with blended learning. Read more...

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Stephen Pham, Expert Advisor, Aug 6, 2018
Hi Kimberly,There are many ways in which you could format your 26 desks. I'd consider the functional needs of your classroom (who needs to go where, when, how, etc.). Check out some resources on the Learning Commons from various organizations on individual rotation: https://app.learning-commons.org/app/search?q=individual%20rotationYou can also find TLA's strategies around Use of Space here: https://practices.learningaccelerator.org/do/practices/integration?subtopic=use-of-space&grade=&audience=&stage=Hope these help!Stephen Pham Read more...
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