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Feb 13, 2017

Anonymous

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Feb 7, 2017

Rebecca H.

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  • Luis Flores, Feb 17, 2017
    I believe that explaining to parents how students will actually be using the technology (to engage with content, receive information in a manner that they can understand, demonstrate their knowledge, and receive feedback) and reassuring them that their student will not just sit mindlessly in-front of a screen, can be a strong argument for more screen time. It may also be helpful to mention all of the other activities that do not involve screen time and how the off-line learning can benefit from students engaging with technology. Read more...

Feb 2, 2017

Deb Ramm

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  • Jennifer Wolfe, Feb 7, 2017
    Deb, My short answer would be to start blended or personalized learning PLCs with different groups of teachers and then start with some of these meatier problems. I recommend you pose these challenges back to the teachers to wrestle with and to pick small steps that they can build upon as the PLC grows in maturity.  Read more...
  • Juliana Finegan, Feb 15, 2017
    You can also have teachers build personal PD playlists to fill individual needs and gaps. By having educators reflect on their individual areas of need, you can help them expand their practice, identify innovative strategies, and improve their approach on a personal basis. Here are some free resources you can explore to share with your educators and give them opportunities to go beyond their current models: TLA Practices - this site gives various practices educators can apply to their classroom. The search bar at the top is particularly helpful when building a playlist because they can search for topics like "student autonomy" and identify different strategies that have been used by the schools showcased. Relay GSE blended learning courses- these can be taken asynchronously or broken apart into sections to help teachers strengthen their skills in mindset, routines, culture, analyzing data, lesson planning, and even becoming a blended leader. Read more...
  • Juliana Finegan, Feb 15, 2017
    For some reason the hyperlinks didn't go through so here they are again!Relay GSE courses: https://www.canvas.net/browse/relayTLA Practices site http://practices.learningaccelerator.org  Read more...

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  • Donna Henry, Feb 1, 2017
    That's a really good question.  In Lewisville ISD, we look at the following indicators:  course completion, grade distribution, state assessment data, and enrollment demographics.  Additionally, we look at parent and student survey data. We also conducted an interesting study this year where we compared a teacher's face-to-face classes and blended classes (see data indicators above).  We found that the blended classes out-performed the traditional classes.   Read more...
  • Julia Freeland Fisher, Feb 21, 2017
    This is such an important question. We have a couple organizing frameworks to think about this - first, when you design a blended program what problem are you trying to solve? Some blended programs are first just trying to expand access... others are looking to target specific student populations to bolster test scores. Measuring a program against it's intended purpose is key - otherwise we may hold early implementation to too high a bar and kill innovation before it can take off. It's also worth noting that if you're using blended to personalize learning, some blended approaches may be working really well for some students and not for others. Traditionally if an intervention is only working for a subset of students we throw it out - but if you manage to measure blended learning results at the individual student level, you can start to offer a menu of experiences that fit different students' preferences and needs.Here's video where we talk through some of these distinctions: http://christenseninstitute.org/blog/unpacking-whether-blended-learning-works/ Read more...
  • Hannah Benoit, Feb 21, 2017
    Thank you both for your thoughtful answers!

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  • Clifford Maxwell, Feb 7, 2017
    For some video training and PD, I would definitely check out resources at BetterLesson - you may find helpful insights from teachers who have created blended lesson plans for a variety of standards. Additionally, there is a treasure trove of content for specific teacher practices from The Learning Accelerator at their Practices at Work tool.  Read more...

Jan 27, 2017

Hiba Amjad

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  • Katrina Bushko, Feb 22, 2017
    Hi Hiba! This is an important question. The framework that we use at the Christensen Institute makes a critical distinction between using technology for technology's sake (tech-rich) versus using technology to achieve a goal such as personalization (blended learning). Of course bridging the digital divide (à la ICT4D) can be a great step towards personalization, but in order to truly personalize a student's learning experience, it's important to start with a rallying cry that can lead you towards not only the right hardware and software choices, but also towards new teacher roles, student roles, and learning models. This is why choosing the technology comes as step #5 in our design wheel for blended learning! I hope this helps! Read more...

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Jan 24, 2017

John Fiske

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  • Clifford Maxwell, Jan 24, 2017
     I see great use in SAMR as a starting point to identify how learning activities can be improved. However, I do believe SAMR to be limited in context of the larger aims of a successful blended (or digital) classroom. For example, something that would qualify as a "Redefinition" in the SAMR framework may be a highly enriching learning activity, but the overall instructional model in the classroom may not be redefining the use of time and space to personalize learning for students, grant student autonomy, give a teacher a chance to offer meaningful feedback, etc. I have visited schools that use the SAMR model as a tool to identify opportunities to enhance learning, but it needs to be accompanied with a clear vision for how you want the overall instructional model to change.  Read more...
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