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Model Overview

Program Overview

2017
Year Launched
9 - 12
Blended Grades

Implementation Q & A

When you first implemented blended learning, why did you choose that particular model? (has your model changed? why?)


Hybrid learning is an instructional strategy that combines new digital resources with proven teaching methods to increase student engagement and improve academic performance. It embeds the systematic use of blended techniques, delivery of lessons in small groups, data to differentiate instruction, individually paced learning and application of multiple educational methodologies. Use of this rotational model ensures that instruction is student-centered. By combining new technology tools with proven teaching methods, the teacher becomes a mentor, guide and support person. In a hybrid learning classroom, instruction is targeted based on individual or small group needs as identified through data-informed reviews. The learning environment remains flexible and responsive as students pace their learning based on content mastery. When given this opportunity to succeed, students will grow and achieve.

What was one of your biggest challenges when going blended, and how did you overcome it?


There are three main challenges we face when implementing these innovative program. One is cost: textbooks are static, one-time buys, whereas with digital content, licenses are yearly expenditures. But if you want robust assessments and data, you have to pay. Another cost component is devices – we have a 1:1 initiative in grades 6-12, and laptops get broken at times and then students are without access until their device is repaired..

The second challenge is getting teachers, especially more experienced teachers, on board. We've had some teachers who couldn't handle the pace of change and decided to retire.

Third, this new blended program is a challenge in time management. Teachers need more time to continue to look at resources, but we understand that this is just reallocating time that would otherwise be spent grading papers and tests.

What's the one piece of advice you'd give to emerging blended-learning programs?


I would advise emerging blended-learning program implementers to plan well in advance of implementation and survey your audiences to ensure you are adjusting things to honor the needs of your students, teachers and families.

Select up to two focus areas you feel that you demonstrate leadership in, and tell us why here:


Dr. Lay was awarded the Hybrid Learning Institute “Producer of the Year “for the most outstanding administrator advocate for the hybrid learning.

Program Focus

General

Blended Subjects

English Language Arts
Social Studies
Electives

Model Overview

Program Overview

2016
Year Launched
9 - 10
Blended Grades

Implementation Q & A

What was one of your biggest challenges when going blended, and how did you overcome it?


There are three main challenges we face when implementing these innovative program. One is cost: textbooks are static, one-time buys, whereas with digital content, licenses are yearly expenditures. But if you want robust assessments and data, you have to pay. Another cost component is devices – we have a 1:1 initiative in grades 6-12, and laptops get broken all the time.

The second challenge is getting teachers, especially more experienced teachers, on board. We've had some teachers who couldn't handle the pace of change and decided to retire.

Third, this new blended program is a challenge in time management. Teachers need more time to continue to look at resources, but we understand that this is just reallocating time that would otherwise be spent grading papers and tests.

Program Focus

General

Edtech

i-Ready
Curriculum
ConnectEd
Curriculum

Blended Subjects

Math

School Overview

We are proud of the work being done by the students and staff at GAHS.

In 2001, Congress reauthorized the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. It was given a moniker at that time reflecting the philosophy governing the legislation – No Child Left Behind. Deeply imbedded within the legislation was the philosophy that schools must work to make each and every student successful. Much of the criticism over the past several years regarding No Child Left Behind is what appears to be a narrow definition of success

Our various and diverse successes indicate what Gettysburg Area High School is about. We truly believe that no child should be left behind – if you love art, music, performing arts, math or science, computers, poetry, building rockets, architectural drawing, the French language, or soccer – it is here and it is done well.

Ratings Source: GreatSchools

Community Rating

GreatSchools Rating

6

out of 10

School Contact

Address:
Gettysburg Area High School
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania
17325 United States

Telephone: (717)-334-6254

Demographics

940
Total Students
39%
FRL
2%
ELL

Student Ethnicity

Additional Test Scores

2018

Blended Program Launched 2016